Why the world needs a knowledge engine now

knowledge economy

Boom in entrepreneurship

In the last decade, entrepreneurship has been on the rise globally.

Driving this growth, we have seen governments, VCs and incubators work together to put policy frameworks and mechanisms to establish this as a legitimate career option while also de-risking it by providing support, grants and a runway for individuals to take the plunge.

As we enter the post-pandemic world, we find ourselves in a global recession. There have been significant layoffs, restructuring of companies, mass migrations and what has come to be known as the great resignation.

During this period, the incentive for people to start their own business, build a personal brand or re-invent and re-skill themselves to become more relevant is becoming more attractive and, in some cases, necessary.

Last year, more than half the adult culture across 35 countries started a business to earn a living for various reasons, including the dire job market.

Human resilience has emerged and is coming to life as more people are choosing the entrepreneurship route to start a business or independently leverage their expertise.

Today, the number of subject matter experts (either as a side or main gig) from around the world on a wide range of topics has increased by over 30 per cent. These independent consultants and domain specialists have a great bank of knowledge to share and use their expertise to build audiences and create different revenue streams.

Also Read: Knowledge commerce is building the next wave of entrepreneurs

Adding to this growth of experts, re-skilling accelerated digitisation, and remote work, while accessing expert knowledge will be integral to a recovery in the new normal and the future of work.

There was a 10.6 per cent growth in productivity in the US due to digitisation, and in Asia, there were 40 million new internet users in 2020.

The monumental shifts in the way we work have created a need to update how people access domain expertise in real-time, learn new technologies and acquire business skills.

The problem with accessing expert knowledge

Expert knowledge refers to the gold dust of high-quality experience, proprietary information and niche knowledge that is not indexed or found on Google, Quora, Wikipedia or even in books. It’s the kind of knowledge that only a few experts possess on a range of topics, which is precisely what makes it so valuable.

Currently, there are three ways to access this knowledge:

  • through disjointed and unauthenticated platforms
  • through the long, cumbersome process of getting in touch with a consulting or research firm
  • in the form of conversations, dialogue, teaching and learning.

These processes are not accessible or affordable to the large group of people who need them. The data received online from Google or Quora is data from raw information available online. It is not “expert knowledge.”

We want to create a solution engine holding a bank of experts. Yes, that one person with the precise knowledge to answer a specific question asked by a startup founder or entrepreneur or another expert who wants to discover something new about a domain.

Wizly aims to create a global platform for leading subject matter experts to connect with the new-age workforce, who will solve business challenges in real-time through micro consulting monetisation methods.

The platform will more efficiently solve business problems while also reducing the friction that comes with effectively connecting the various parties involved.

Also Read: Why steward leadership matters when startups dress to impress

Wizly is being built to power the economy of professional knowledge where professional experts can create content, talk to users and solve user problems.

It is owned by experts and users and powered by Wizlings, a solution currency used on the platform. It will empower thousands of individuals through the information to help them reach their goals and be successful.

It can empower the experts by helping them build an audience, monetise on their knowledge and build a brand that can give them heightened visibility.

Editor’s note: e27 aims to foster thought leadership by publishing views from the community. Share your opinion by submitting an article, video, podcast, or infographic.

Join our e27 Telegram group, FB community, or like the e27 Facebook page

Image credit: stylephotographs

The post Why the world needs a knowledge engine now appeared first on e27.

,

knowledge economy

Boom in entrepreneurship

In the last decade, entrepreneurship has been on the rise globally.

Driving this growth, we have seen governments, VCs and incubators work together to put policy frameworks and mechanisms to establish this as a legitimate career option while also de-risking it by providing support, grants and a runway for individuals to take the plunge.

As we enter the post-pandemic world, we find ourselves in a global recession. There have been significant layoffs, restructuring of companies, mass migrations and what has come to be known as the great resignation.

During this period, the incentive for people to start their own business, build a personal brand or re-invent and re-skill themselves to become more relevant is becoming more attractive and, in some cases, necessary.

Last year, more than half the adult culture across 35 countries started a business to earn a living for various reasons, including the dire job market.

Human resilience has emerged and is coming to life as more people are choosing the entrepreneurship route to start a business or independently leverage their expertise.

Today, the number of subject matter experts (either as a side or main gig) from around the world on a wide range of topics has increased by over 30 per cent. These independent consultants and domain specialists have a great bank of knowledge to share and use their expertise to build audiences and create different revenue streams.

Also Read: Knowledge commerce is building the next wave of entrepreneurs

Adding to this growth of experts, re-skilling accelerated digitisation, and remote work, while accessing expert knowledge will be integral to a recovery in the new normal and the future of work.

There was a 10.6 per cent growth in productivity in the US due to digitisation, and in Asia, there were 40 million new internet users in 2020.

The monumental shifts in the way we work have created a need to update how people access domain expertise in real-time, learn new technologies and acquire business skills.

The problem with accessing expert knowledge

Expert knowledge refers to the gold dust of high-quality experience, proprietary information and niche knowledge that is not indexed or found on Google, Quora, Wikipedia or even in books. It’s the kind of knowledge that only a few experts possess on a range of topics, which is precisely what makes it so valuable.

Currently, there are three ways to access this knowledge:

  • through disjointed and unauthenticated platforms
  • through the long, cumbersome process of getting in touch with a consulting or research firm
  • in the form of conversations, dialogue, teaching and learning.

These processes are not accessible or affordable to the large group of people who need them. The data received online from Google or Quora is data from raw information available online. It is not “expert knowledge.”

We want to create a solution engine holding a bank of experts. Yes, that one person with the precise knowledge to answer a specific question asked by a startup founder or entrepreneur or another expert who wants to discover something new about a domain.

Wizly aims to create a global platform for leading subject matter experts to connect with the new-age workforce, who will solve business challenges in real-time through micro consulting monetisation methods.

The platform will more efficiently solve business problems while also reducing the friction that comes with effectively connecting the various parties involved.

Also Read: Why steward leadership matters when startups dress to impress

Wizly is being built to power the economy of professional knowledge where professional experts can create content, talk to users and solve user problems.

It is owned by experts and users and powered by Wizlings, a solution currency used on the platform. It will empower thousands of individuals through the information to help them reach their goals and be successful.

It can empower the experts by helping them build an audience, monetise on their knowledge and build a brand that can give them heightened visibility.

Editor’s note: e27 aims to foster thought leadership by publishing views from the community. Share your opinion by submitting an article, video, podcast, or infographic.

Join our e27 Telegram group, FB community, or like the e27 Facebook page

Image credit: stylephotographs

The post Why the world needs a knowledge engine now appeared first on e27.

Leave a Reply