How to simplify the overcomplicated hiring process

hiring

Gone are the days when a jobseeker could send a CV to many companies and get a call for an interview without any fuss.

Nowadays, candidates have to go through a seemingly never-ending number of hiring rounds while also overcoming innovative recruitment technology solutions that have entered the market recently. This issue is particularly prevalent in the tech, finance and energy sectors.

Candidates are now jumping over various hurdles, working their way through a maze of application forms, tests and using all sorts of technology, from TikTok resume applications to video recordings.

These additional steps in the hiring process have made it tedious, confusing, frustrating and demoralising. It seems there is a myth that the more extended recruitment formula will help companies weed out the perfect candidate for the vacant role.

In truth, the applicants who are persevering through this unsettling number of interviews are those who are desperate to get a job. They may not have other opportunities available or the necessary qualities to be successful in the role.

Unfortunately for the recruiters, bad interview experiences can drive talents away and damage a company’s reputation through word of mouth.

So, how can employers strike a balance between streamlining the hiring process and capture significant and granular assessments of the candidate without losing them?

Despite the advances in modern-day recruitment techniques, the current processes still face several challenges.

Talent shortage

There is a high global demand for tech talent in the technology and digital industries and other sectors. Currently, the supply does not meet the market’s requirements, which means the power no longer resides with HR professionals but rather with the tech-trained applicants.

Recruiters are finding themselves forced to compete for the few qualified candidates, going as far as reaching out to them on job board platforms. In addition, companies now have to raise their salary offers and benefits to attract the best people.

Human touch versus technology

Another challenge is determining when and how to use recruiting technology and when the HR professional should step in to process the applications. Remember, the candidate’s hiring experience is crucial, and their journey through every stage will reflect positively or negatively on the company’s culture.

Also read: Why we need to embrace HR tech adoption stat

Chasing trends

Some job interview approaches are unsuitable for certain industries. For example, what a recruiter looks for in a coder will be different from an events coordinator.

Technology also faces a similar challenge, as the tools you might use in one sector might not suit candidates from other niches.

HR professionals have to grapple with outdated and recent interview techniques. The desire to reduce potentially making bad choices has resulted in conducting too many hiring rounds.

Additionally, the fear of missing out is bringing new and sometimes unsuitable recruitment methods to the fore.

Desperation

Lack of employment options and talent shortages create an unexpected issue for companies regarding quality and quantity. The damage to jobs resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic creates gaps, and many unemployed candidates are desperate to find work.

Ultimately, recruitment is expensive, and the hiring managers have to get it right to prevent future costs. If a new hire ends up being unsuitable for the role, the whole process may require undertaking again, adding a further cost burden to the company.

Choosing the best interview strategy

Presently, employers have access to technological tools for identifying the correct candidate for vacant positions. Experienced HR and talent acquisition managers define the hiring models and technologies needed for different roles.

It is then vital to map out an interview strategy by first understanding your needs and adopting an agile recruitment process.

Here are three areas to focus on:

Sourcing candidates

There is no one size fits all approach to recruitment. For example, various age groups and generations use different job application methods, and HR professionals may also use diverse hiring models. Even so, knowing whether a candidate fits the hiring criteria before moving forward to the interview stage ensures the possibility of success.

Using technology makes it possible to filter the ideal candidates without reviewing hundreds or thousands of resumes. Too many applications can be overwhelming, and failing to respond to them effectively can harm a brand.

A good recruitment strategy includes exploring many recruitment channels to source more suitable interviewees for the specific role.

Focus on one industry

Copying trends that are unsuitable for an industry can hurt the employment process. The latest hiring methods, such as video resumes, do not belong in every sector–these measures might work in more extroverted roles but may not be appropriate for a less client-facing position.

In some industries, tests are helpful to ascertain the applicant’s suitability, but in others, they are just time-consuming and irrelevant.

Versatility is essential in the digital age. Allowing adaptation to different interview and application processes depending on the sector or role can make a difference in finding the right talent.

Limiting interview rounds

Organisations should be aware of the talent shortage and not waste time during recruitment. The number of rounds needed in the interview depends on the nature of the role and its level in the company. Plus, the faster you complete the hiring process, the less likely the candidate will take up other competing offers.

Guide the candidates through the process and timelines to ensure they know what will occur. Limit the interviews to less than three rounds for minor roles and about four for senior positions. Having excessive rounds will only damage the perception of your company in the eyes of candidates.

Using a talent platform for recruitment

Recruitment technology such as the Grit job search platform is a game-changer with its talent-first approach to hiring. Instead of candidates applying to companies, the potential employers contact them directly on the website highlighting job opportunities that might interest the candidate.

Also read: What will the next wave of VC investment in HR tech look like?

It filters talent by geography, abilities and salary, and HR experts can target future employees, shortlist and contact them.

Moreover, the platform reduces the shortlist period to 24-48 hours and decreases hiring times from a maximum of 12 weeks to just three weeks. Candidates can register on the website in about a minute, and the profile stays anonymous until a potential employer requests to see the full details.

This search approach is very different from the established job hunting and recruitment methods. It saves companies time, resources, and money by streamlining processes and cutting out unnecessary recruitment headaches.

Talent recruitment will continue to change and evolve as technological advances, including AI and machine learning innovations, and better hiring strategies emerge. Streamlining the process will initially involve using robot interviews and video resume applications before progressing to the stages conducted by humans.

Many recruits and HR personnel will find it easy to adapt, while others, unfortunately, may struggle to adjust to the new realities.

Recruiters must review their internal business processes as the latest technology enters the market. While no hiring model is perfect, it is possible to find a process that fits the positions candidates are applying for and the job level in the company.

Cutting down the length of the interview stages to avoid frustrating the applicants is essential. If the candidates feel the process is tedious, they might drop out believing the recruiter is undervaluing the time and effort to apply for the role.

It can also reflect poorly on the organisation, as the lengthy exasperating procedures may seem part of the work culture there.

The belief that a hiring process of one to three months is the best for securing the ideal employee is not entirely accurate.

While a company might find a fantastic candidate that way, it is also likely that the more desperate applicants and those who do not have other options will stick around longer than others will. The result is an ineffectual, drawn out and infuriating interview process.

Editor’s note: e27 aims to foster thought leadership by publishing views from the community. Share your opinion by submitting an article, video, podcast, or infographic

Join our e27 Telegram group, FB community, or like the e27 Facebook page

Image credit: fizkes

The post How to simplify the overcomplicated hiring process appeared first on e27.

,
hiring

Gone are the days when a jobseeker could send a CV to many companies and get a call for an interview without any fuss.

Nowadays, candidates have to go through a seemingly never-ending number of hiring rounds while also overcoming innovative recruitment technology solutions that have entered the market recently. This issue is particularly prevalent in the tech, finance and energy sectors.

Candidates are now jumping over various hurdles, working their way through a maze of application forms, tests and using all sorts of technology, from TikTok resume applications to video recordings.

These additional steps in the hiring process have made it tedious, confusing, frustrating and demoralising. It seems there is a myth that the more extended recruitment formula will help companies weed out the perfect candidate for the vacant role.

In truth, the applicants who are persevering through this unsettling number of interviews are those who are desperate to get a job. They may not have other opportunities available or the necessary qualities to be successful in the role.

Unfortunately for the recruiters, bad interview experiences can drive talents away and damage a company’s reputation through word of mouth.

So, how can employers strike a balance between streamlining the hiring process and capture significant and granular assessments of the candidate without losing them?

Despite the advances in modern-day recruitment techniques, the current processes still face several challenges.

Talent shortage

There is a high global demand for tech talent in the technology and digital industries and other sectors. Currently, the supply does not meet the market’s requirements, which means the power no longer resides with HR professionals but rather with the tech-trained applicants.

Recruiters are finding themselves forced to compete for the few qualified candidates, going as far as reaching out to them on job board platforms. In addition, companies now have to raise their salary offers and benefits to attract the best people.

Human touch versus technology

Another challenge is determining when and how to use recruiting technology and when the HR professional should step in to process the applications. Remember, the candidate’s hiring experience is crucial, and their journey through every stage will reflect positively or negatively on the company’s culture.

Also read: Why we need to embrace HR tech adoption stat

Chasing trends

Some job interview approaches are unsuitable for certain industries. For example, what a recruiter looks for in a coder will be different from an events coordinator.

Technology also faces a similar challenge, as the tools you might use in one sector might not suit candidates from other niches.

HR professionals have to grapple with outdated and recent interview techniques. The desire to reduce potentially making bad choices has resulted in conducting too many hiring rounds.

Additionally, the fear of missing out is bringing new and sometimes unsuitable recruitment methods to the fore.

Desperation

Lack of employment options and talent shortages create an unexpected issue for companies regarding quality and quantity. The damage to jobs resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic creates gaps, and many unemployed candidates are desperate to find work.

Ultimately, recruitment is expensive, and the hiring managers have to get it right to prevent future costs. If a new hire ends up being unsuitable for the role, the whole process may require undertaking again, adding a further cost burden to the company.

Choosing the best interview strategy

Presently, employers have access to technological tools for identifying the correct candidate for vacant positions. Experienced HR and talent acquisition managers define the hiring models and technologies needed for different roles.

It is then vital to map out an interview strategy by first understanding your needs and adopting an agile recruitment process.

Here are three areas to focus on:

Sourcing candidates

There is no one size fits all approach to recruitment. For example, various age groups and generations use different job application methods, and HR professionals may also use diverse hiring models. Even so, knowing whether a candidate fits the hiring criteria before moving forward to the interview stage ensures the possibility of success.

Using technology makes it possible to filter the ideal candidates without reviewing hundreds or thousands of resumes. Too many applications can be overwhelming, and failing to respond to them effectively can harm a brand.

A good recruitment strategy includes exploring many recruitment channels to source more suitable interviewees for the specific role.

Focus on one industry

Copying trends that are unsuitable for an industry can hurt the employment process. The latest hiring methods, such as video resumes, do not belong in every sector–these measures might work in more extroverted roles but may not be appropriate for a less client-facing position.

In some industries, tests are helpful to ascertain the applicant’s suitability, but in others, they are just time-consuming and irrelevant.

Versatility is essential in the digital age. Allowing adaptation to different interview and application processes depending on the sector or role can make a difference in finding the right talent.

Limiting interview rounds

Organisations should be aware of the talent shortage and not waste time during recruitment. The number of rounds needed in the interview depends on the nature of the role and its level in the company. Plus, the faster you complete the hiring process, the less likely the candidate will take up other competing offers.

Guide the candidates through the process and timelines to ensure they know what will occur. Limit the interviews to less than three rounds for minor roles and about four for senior positions. Having excessive rounds will only damage the perception of your company in the eyes of candidates.

Using a talent platform for recruitment

Recruitment technology such as the Grit job search platform is a game-changer with its talent-first approach to hiring. Instead of candidates applying to companies, the potential employers contact them directly on the website highlighting job opportunities that might interest the candidate.

Also read: What will the next wave of VC investment in HR tech look like?

It filters talent by geography, abilities and salary, and HR experts can target future employees, shortlist and contact them.

Moreover, the platform reduces the shortlist period to 24-48 hours and decreases hiring times from a maximum of 12 weeks to just three weeks. Candidates can register on the website in about a minute, and the profile stays anonymous until a potential employer requests to see the full details.

This search approach is very different from the established job hunting and recruitment methods. It saves companies time, resources, and money by streamlining processes and cutting out unnecessary recruitment headaches.

Talent recruitment will continue to change and evolve as technological advances, including AI and machine learning innovations, and better hiring strategies emerge. Streamlining the process will initially involve using robot interviews and video resume applications before progressing to the stages conducted by humans.

Many recruits and HR personnel will find it easy to adapt, while others, unfortunately, may struggle to adjust to the new realities.

Recruiters must review their internal business processes as the latest technology enters the market. While no hiring model is perfect, it is possible to find a process that fits the positions candidates are applying for and the job level in the company.

Cutting down the length of the interview stages to avoid frustrating the applicants is essential. If the candidates feel the process is tedious, they might drop out believing the recruiter is undervaluing the time and effort to apply for the role.

It can also reflect poorly on the organisation, as the lengthy exasperating procedures may seem part of the work culture there.

The belief that a hiring process of one to three months is the best for securing the ideal employee is not entirely accurate.

While a company might find a fantastic candidate that way, it is also likely that the more desperate applicants and those who do not have other options will stick around longer than others will. The result is an ineffectual, drawn out and infuriating interview process.

Editor’s note: e27 aims to foster thought leadership by publishing views from the community. Share your opinion by submitting an article, video, podcast, or infographic

Join our e27 Telegram group, FB community, or like the e27 Facebook page

Image credit: fizkes

The post How to simplify the overcomplicated hiring process appeared first on e27.

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